Tag: <span>11thStreetBridgePark</span>

Urban Land Magazine / May 25, 2022

Envisioning Inclusion: How Scott Kratz Transformed Bold Community Voices into the 11th Street Bridge Park

Scott Kratz is the senior vice president of Building Bridges Across the River (Building Bridges), and director of the 11th Street Bridge Project, Building Bridge’s largest project to date. Building Bridges and the Washington, D.C., city government are transforming an old freeway bridge into a park above the Anacostia River. The base of one of the bridges will become a one-of-a-kind civic space supporting active recreation, environmental education, and the arts.

American Planning Association / January 27, 2022

How to Create Shovel-Worthy Infrastructure

Human beings are hardwired to seek out what we define as “wellbeing”: connection and belonging; safety; familiarity and predictability; purposeful and creative influence on our surroundings and future; and access to food, shelter, and other resources without shame or danger. Wellbeing is about being whole, as individuals and communities. While health and wellness are part of this, wellbeing reaches much further and deeper. It’s foundational.

Public Square / Congress for the New Urbanism / January 18, 2022

Signature park project bridges community divide

Successful equitable development takes work but there are steps and actions organizations can take to ensure local communities are truly involved. The 11th Street Bridge Park in Washington, D.C. will break ground later this year, but it is the long-term community engagement work that illustrates how time, trust, and collective ownership are vital to successful equitable development.

Harvard Social Impact Review / December 15, 2021

Escaping Infrastructure’s Shadow Puppets: Lessons From Equitably Repurposing Public Spaces

Washington has a consensus: American infrastructure is overdue for capital improvements and maintenance. The most fervent debates on this topic have focused on how much funding should be allocated. But the most important discussion, even when it comes to hard infrastructure (e.g., rail, bridges, roads, and sidewalks), should be about how funding should be spent.

Shelterforce / July 13, 2021

First a Park, Then a Citywide Land Trust in D.C.

The 11th Street Bridge Park, slated to break ground this year in Washington, D.C., will offer a pedestrian walkway uniting D.C.’s Capitol Hill/Navy Yard with the historic Anacostia neighborhood. In addition to providing a public performance space, the hope is that the park will also forge a connection between one of the district’s most prosperous areas and one of its poorest neighborhoods, which has been historically overlooked.

The Washington Post / April 23, 2021

A bridge-turned-park in Southeast can be a national example of how to reconnect communities

Largely overlooked in President Biden’s economic recovery and infrastructure plan is a sweeping effort to reconnect communities divided by urban highways. The $20 billion in aid Biden proposed in his American Jobs Plan would be a historic effort to correct the racism in how we built our highway system and lay the groundwork for reinvigorating neighborhoods — such as Anacostia in Southeast Washington — that have suffered for decades because of those decisions.

Next City / February 10, 2021

Can a Park Prevent Gentrification?

The upheavals of the past year – the pandemic, recession, protests over racial injustice and a violent insurrection at the Capitol — have laid bare the great fissures in American society. Today we are a nation deeply divided by income, race, and class. Amid calls for healing and justice, President Biden promises to “build back better,” with development that promotes racial and economic equity.