What started as an unlikely plan to save an elevated railway on Manhattan’s West Side has turned into an extraordinary public space.

The High Line is a 1.5-mile greenway that runs through several New York City neighborhoods. Founded by neighborhood residents, Friends of the High Line partnered with elected leaders, government officials, and supporters to preserve the historic structure and fund the transformation of the High Line into a public space. Today, working in partnership with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, Friends of the High Line manages and operates the park, and raises nearly 100% of its annual operating budget. The High Line puts on more than 400 free programs a year and hosts rotating world-class art exhibits through its High Line Art program. In 2016, the High Line saw more than seven million visitors—one third of them New York City residents. As part of its ongoing commitment to the neighborhood surrounding the park, the High Line offers teen employment opportunities that give teens important training in professional skills—from horticulture to environmental justice.

Project Details

Infrastructure Type Railway
Status Open / Ongoing
Opening Section 1: June 2009
Section 2: June 2011
Section 3: September 2014
Spur: June 2019
Size 6.7 acres, 1.5 miles
Design Team James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Piet Oudolf
Management

Managed and operated by Friends of the High Line in partnership with the City of New York

Latest News / High Line

The Villager / January 23, 2019

High Line's Spur and Plinth coming down the track

With the High Line’s newest section, the Spur, set to open in April, final work is being done on this offshoot before it officially opens. The plaza offers remarkable views of the city in all four directions and will feature the Plinth, a space for showing monumental works of art.

National Recreation and Park Association / December 7, 2018

New urban infrastructure parks

The High Line is an urban park that might have never been built and is now estimated to be responsible for $2B in impact. The Atlanta BeltLine, Buffalo Bayou in Houston, The 606 in Chicago, The Underline in Miami, Philadelphia’s Rail Park, and the 11th Street Bridge Park in Washington, D.C. are among the emerging projects looking to unlock the potential of reimagined infrastructure and the benefits it can bring to their cities.