Houston’s most significant natural resource, Buffalo Bayou, is increasingly accessible to locals and visitors alike, thanks to the efforts of Buffalo Bayou Partnership and funding from numerous public and private entities.

With a focus on revitalizing a 10-mile stretch of the bayou over the past 30 years, Buffalo Bayou Partnership (BBP) has already transformed sections of the bayou and its banks to create parks, trails, and bridges. Most recently, BBP renovated the 160-acre green space called Buffalo Bayou Park. The park features trails, a nature play area, dog park, performance pavilions, a cafe, and two visitor centers, which offer boat and bike rentals. Planning has begun for BBP’s next big project, the equitable development of Buffalo Bayou’s eastern sector. BBP is working with local partners to revitalize neighborhoods in the area, while celebrating their rich cultural and industrial heritage.

Project Details

Infrastructure Type Waterfront / Waterway
Status Open / Ongoing
Opening 1986
Size 6400 acres, 10 miles
Design Team SWA, Page, Herves Descottes, Reed Hilderbrand, Lake/Flato
Management

Managed and operated by Buffalo Bayou Partnership in partnership with the City of Houston, Harris County, and Harris County Flood Control District

Latest News / Buffalo Bayou

The Hill / January 2, 2020

City parks aren't luxuries. They are critical infrastructure

Nearly 80 percent of Americans live in cities and metropolitan areas. Increasingly, those cities are challenged by aging water and transportation systems that are nearing or exceeding their designed capacity. A new focus on flood and other natural disaster resilience is driving city planners to leverage mixed-use infrastructure, including parks, to address civic needs while taking advantage of cost savings and other social benefits.

CoStar News / December 3, 2019

Houston's Buffalo Bayou transformation offers flood-plan lessons to other cities

During Hurricane Harvey, Buffalo Bayou Park was inundated with floodwaters. Mountains of sand and debris littered the park’s western end. Yet within a week, joggers returned to the trails and the restaurant was up and running. The relatively fast reopening signals how urban planning mitigated the damage of one of the costliest floods in U.S. history. And planners say it now holds broader lessons as the growing challenge to plan for the effects of climate change becomes a larger part of commercial development.