Houston’s most significant natural resource, Buffalo Bayou, is increasingly accessible to locals and visitors alike, thanks to the efforts of Buffalo Bayou Partnership and funding from numerous public and private entities.

With a focus on revitalizing a 10-mile stretch of the bayou over the past 30 years, Buffalo Bayou Partnership (BBP) has already transformed sections of the bayou and its banks to create parks, trails, and bridges. Most recently, BBP renovated the 160-acre green space called Buffalo Bayou Park. The park features trails, a nature play area, dog park, performance pavilions, a cafe, and two visitor centers, which offer boat and bike rentals. Planning has begun for BBP’s next big project, the equitable development of Buffalo Bayou’s eastern sector. BBP is working with local partners to revitalize neighborhoods in the area, while celebrating their rich cultural and industrial heritage.

Project Details

Infrastructure Type Waterfront / Waterway
Status Open / Ongoing
Opening 1986
Size 10 miles
Design Team SWA, Page, Herves Descottes, Reed Hilderbrand, Lake/Flato, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, ISA, NADAAA
Management

Managed and operated by Buffalo Bayou Partnership in partnership with the City of Houston, Harris County, and Harris County Flood Control District

Project Leader Anne Olson

Latest News / Buffalo Bayou

Houston Chronicle / October 2, 2022

Essay: Why Houston’s latest Buffalo Bayou park starts with affordable housing

It’s really quite a lovely park, with features that check all the standard boxes: a playground, a gazebo with a big table, a soccer field, restrooms and water fountains, a paved trail that winds through the property, and lots of plain old green space. On a recent weekday afternoon, though, a visit to Tony Marron Park on Houston’s East End revealed a few glitches. The water fountains worked fine, but the restrooms were locked up tight. It took me a while to find a spot that offered a view of Buffalo Bayou, just north of the park. And on the nicest day in Houston since long-ago spring, the only visitors besides me were a dozen or so staff and volunteers with the Texas Organizing Project, clustered in the shade of the gazebo as they prepared for an afternoon of block-walking.

Harvard Social Impact Review / December 15, 2021

Escaping Infrastructure’s Shadow Puppets: Lessons From Equitably Repurposing Public Spaces

Washington has a consensus: American infrastructure is overdue for capital improvements and maintenance. The most fervent debates on this topic have focused on how much funding should be allocated. But the most important discussion, even when it comes to hard infrastructure (e.g., rail, bridges, roads, and sidewalks), should be about how funding should be spent.