The Atlanta BeltLine is the most comprehensive transportation and economic development effort ever undertaken in the City of Atlanta and among the largest urban revitalization programs currently underway in the United States.

The BeltLine is a planned loop of parks, trails, transit, and affordable housing that circles the City of Atlanta. Built mostly in abandoned railway corridors, it will include 33 miles of multi-use trails, 22 miles of light rail transit, 1,300 acres of new greenspace, and 1,100 acres of remediated brownfields. The 8.75 miles of open trails are lined with public art installations and a linear arboretum. The parks and trails are home to hundreds of free fitness classes. The Atlanta BeltLine will ultimately connect 45 in-town neighborhoods, provide first and last mile connectivity for regional transportation initiatives, and put Atlanta on a path to 21st century growth and sustainability.

Project Details

Infrastructure Type Railway
Status Open / Ongoing
Opening October 2008
Anticipated completion in 2030
Size 22 miles
Design Team Perkins + Will, Kimley Horn
Management

Managed and operated by Atlanta BeltLine, Inc., the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership, and the City of Atlanta

Latest News / Atlanta BeltLine

Parade / March 16, 2020

Network members make 50+ best greenways across America list

Parade pulled together more than 50 greenways, at least one from each state, in hopes that you’ll be inspired to meander with us through neighborhoods, parklands, woodlands, wetlands—even mountains, canyons, deserts and glaciers. Turns out, some greenways are not even green but are white with snow or ice, and others in urban corridors are filled with confetti-colored murals.

The Hill / January 2, 2020

City parks aren't luxuries. They are critical infrastructure

Nearly 80 percent of Americans live in cities and metropolitan areas. Increasingly, those cities are challenged by aging water and transportation systems that are nearing or exceeding their designed capacity. A new focus on flood and other natural disaster resilience is driving city planners to leverage mixed-use infrastructure, including parks, to address civic needs while taking advantage of cost savings and other social benefits.