The 11th Street Bridge Park will be DC’s first elevated park, stitching together neighborhoods long-divided by the Anacostia River in the southeast quadrant of the city.

The 11th Street Bridge Park (Bridge Park) is a project of the nonprofit Building Bridges Across the River and the DC government, whose partnership ensures that the park meets a diverse set of social, health, environmental, and economic goals. The Bridge Park team has led their work with a strong focus on equity by engaging with hundreds of community members to develop an Equitable Development Plan that addresses how cities can make smart investments in communities to ensure longtime residents can stay and thrive in their neighborhoods. To that end, the team has raised over $5 million to implement the plan’s strategies and is working with Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC.) LISC has committed $50 million through their Elevating Equity initiative that makes direct investment to organizations working toward equity in the Bridge Park’s impact area.

Project Details

Infrastructure Type Highway
Status Advocacy & Design
Opening 2023
Size 3 acres
Design Team OMA, OLIN
Management

Building Bridges Across the River

Latest News / 11th Street Bridge Park

The Washington Post / November 20, 2019

A new bridge in the District wants to keep local communities parked

The development of new parks and green space can often lead to displacement and gentrification. 11th Street Bridge Park is making a conscious effort to keep lifelong residents of Southeast Washington in place through community land trusts. The community land trusts was implemented as part of the development plan to maintain affordable homes in the surrounding area of the park.

New York Times / October 8, 2019

City parks piggyback on infrastructure

The High Line gave impetus to the idea of adding greenery to infrastructure that is raised off the ground. Conceived, funded and built by the nonprofit Friends of the High Line, the park has inspired so many infrastructure-reuse projects that its founders formed the High Line Network to help others learn the ropes — and avoid pitfalls.