The 11th Street Bridge Park will be DC’s first elevated park, stitching together neighborhoods long-divided by the Anacostia River in the southeast quadrant of the city.

The 11th Street Bridge Park (Bridge Park) is a project of the nonprofit Building Bridges Across the River and the DC government, whose partnership ensures that the park meets a diverse set of social, health, environmental, and economic goals. The Bridge Park team has led their work with a strong focus on equity by engaging with hundreds of community members to develop an Equitable Development Plan that addresses how cities can make smart investments in communities to ensure longtime residents can stay and thrive in their neighborhoods. To that end, the team has secured over $10 million to implement the plan’s strategies and is working with Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC.) LISC has committed $63 million through their Elevating Equity initiative that makes direct investment to organizations working toward equity in the Bridge Park’s impact area.

Project Details

Infrastructure Type Highway
Status In Construction
Opening 2023
Size 7 acres
Design Team OMA, OLIN, WRA
Management

Building Bridges Across the River

Project Leader Scott Kratz

Steering Committee Member

Latest News / 11th Street Bridge Park

Shelterforce / July 13, 2021

First a Park, Then a Citywide Land Trust in D.C.

The 11th Street Bridge Park, slated to break ground this year in Washington, D.C., will offer a pedestrian walkway uniting D.C.’s Capitol Hill/Navy Yard with the historic Anacostia neighborhood. In addition to providing a public performance space, the hope is that the park will also forge a connection between one of the district’s most prosperous areas and one of its poorest neighborhoods, which has been historically overlooked.

The Washington Post / April 23, 2021

A bridge-turned-park in Southeast can be a national example of how to reconnect communities

Largely overlooked in President Biden’s economic recovery and infrastructure plan is a sweeping effort to reconnect communities divided by urban highways. The $20 billion in aid Biden proposed in his American Jobs Plan would be a historic effort to correct the racism in how we built our highway system and lay the groundwork for reinvigorating neighborhoods — such as Anacostia in Southeast Washington — that have suffered for decades because of those decisions.