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Fast Company / July 13, 2018

This brand lets you help save the U.S. national parks

Parks Project launched four years ago as a social enterprise specifically geared at funding much-needed national parks maintenance. Each purchase of a Parks Project item funds a specific backlogged maintenance project, identified by one of the 30 parks conservancies that have partnered with the company so far.

Next City / July 13, 2018

Seattle requiring developers to engage communities at earlier project phases

Seattle’s new regulations will require developers to begin community outreach at the very first stage of the review process. This requirement is intended to help developers better understand the local context and hear community interests and concerns related to their project from the start.

Curbed / June 21, 2018

20 things cities can do to boost the quality of public life

Today, the Center for Active Design and the Knight Foundation announced the release of the Assembly: Civic Design Guidelines, a groundbreaking playbook for creating well-designed and well-maintained public spaces as a force for building trust and healing divisions in local communities.

Slate / June 12, 2018

Highways have divided city neighborhoods for decades. Can they be redeemed?

In densely built, high-cost cities, the space around and beneath highways is now seen not as a hopeless barrier but as an opportunity. Cities around the world are reclaiming these “el-spaces” for the benefit of the public, transforming highway corridors into skate trails, safe pedestrian connections, and green spaces.

PR Newswire / June 12, 2018

First glimpse of 200-acre Missouri Riverfront master plan

OJB Landscape Architecture released concept designs for downtown Omaha’s new riverfront park, which is part of a master plan to revitalize underutilized, industrial areas adjacent to the Missouri River. The proposal would span both sides of the river, unifying Omaha and Council Bluffs into a regional destination.

Curbed / June 6, 2018

BeltLine CEO: 5,600 affordable housing units won’t cut it

The Atlanta BeltLine’s original master plan outlined ambitions to create 5,600 affordable housing units along the trail over a 25-year period. Brian McGowan, who stepped into the project’s CEO role amid concerns of undelivered affordability promises, wants to increase the promised number of affordable units to 10,000.