Latest

riverla.org / November 26, 2019

Former Los Angeles Councilmember Ed Reyes Named Next Executive Director of River LA

The River LA Board of Directors voted this week to name Ed Reyes the next Executive Director of River LA. As a former Los Angeles Councilmember and long-standing advocate for the revitalization of the LA River, Reyes will bring nearly 20 years of momentum knitting together community members, government, and other non-profits in support of the Los Angeles River.

The Washington Post / November 20, 2019

A new bridge in the District wants to keep local communities parked

The development of new parks and green space can often lead to displacement and gentrification. 11th Street Bridge Park is making a conscious effort to keep lifelong residents of Southeast Washington in place through community land trusts. The community land trusts was implemented as part of the development plan to maintain affordable homes in the surrounding area of the park.

New York Times / November 1, 2019

'The Writing on the Wall': Voices of the Incarcerated

An installation on the High Line shares writing by prisoners in a space that emulates cells. The Writing on the Wall is the second project of the High Line Network Joint Art Initiative and will travel to other sites across the United States.

Next City / October 30, 2019

Can the High Line Use Its Notoriety to Advance the Park Equity Movement?

Earlier this month, Friends of the High Line, the nonprofit that operates and manages the High Line in collaboration with New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, brought together leaders of 60 infrastructure reuse projects from the U.S. and Canada for a symposium titled “Economic Impact and Beyond.” Its goal was to examine if new public spaces, being created out of underutilized infrastructure, were incorporating equity considerations into their plans and explore strategies to ensure that benefits from such projects reach all communities.

Next City / October 22, 2019

Teen Urban Designers Transform Chicago Public Spaces

Chicago architects used a grant in 2012 to interview teens and adults about how they experience public spaces. Listening to the teens’ perspective inspired them to create a path for young people to get involved in urban planning.